Sound Wave Cycles


#1

I studied sound waves development and I found an interesting thing.

First Sound Waves

Figure 7: The adding together of two waves that differ only slightly in frequency illustrates “beating”

Then Sentient Trader 18 months cycle

Are cycles on PEAKS and THROUGHS slightly different in frequency?

MARKET BEAT would be a strength of that particular cycle - that may explain why cycles become dominant and fade later



Next concept would require some experiments with harmonics, which in contrary to the first glance reinforces Hurst Theory.

In this case, price bottom would form at the “End” of the fundamental cycle and all other cycles would end at that point as well.
And it explains why Bear Market is much faster than Bull Market.



Has anyone tried to measure Fibonacci relationship between cycles? In Amplitude.
Maybe Fibonacci levels are not magic lines, but merely relation of different cycles superimposed on each other or their harmonic.

Does anyone know a sound engineer who is a trader??? 2in 1

Here are interesting links:

http://clas.mq.edu.au/speech/acoustics/waveforms/adding_waveforms.html

http://clas.mq.edu.au/speech/acoustics/waveforms/adding_waveforms.html


#2

This is a subject right up my street. I am not a sound engineer in the strictest sense but I do know a lot about programming synths etc for music.

Infact one of the aspects that attracted me to Hurst Cycles was the similarities to musical frequencies.

The principle of summation is a technique that could be said to be demonstrated within ‘additive’ synthesis. This is the process of adding ‘partials’ (usually sine waves) together to arrive at a certain timbre.

By contrast ‘subtractive’ synthesis involves starting with white noise and sculpting frequencies away to arrive at your desired timble.

All sounds we hear are made from distinct layers of frequencies. A consonant, tonal (or pleasing sound) usually contains a base (root) frequency and layers of harmonically related frequencies above (a major chord for example). On the contrary a dissonant or atonal sound contains frequencies not in a harmonic relationship to the root.

I wonder what the timbre of the market is…


#3

the timbre of the market is PI


#4

Can you play it though, thats the test…:wink:


#5

with enough data you can play anything